Two people walking on a street Two people walking on a street

Our three recommendations

Recommendations

The Commission’s three recommendations are based on the evidence in the research and aim to address the key challenges that it highlights.

Recommendation 1: Public authorities should identify how they can tackle targeted harassment through delivery of their public sector equality duty.

They can achieve this by:

  • Collecting and analysing information on the prevalence and impact of harassment targeted at all protected characteristics. This will provide the evidence required to develop more effective responses and address the concerns of local people at risk of experiencing targeted harassment.
  • Engaging with people at risk of experiencing targeted harassment. This will help fill gaps in evidence; empower people to develop more effective responses and help reassure local people that they will get the help they need if they experience targeted harassment.
  • Evaluating the success of actions to prevent and respond to targeted harassment and communicating this locally. This will help identify what works and make it easier for local people to hold their public authorities to account for performance in tackling targeted harassment.
  • Analysing the equality and good relations impacts of cuts or reforms to targeted harassment services and taking steps to mitigate any negative impacts. This will help public authorities to have due regard to their public sector equality duty obligations and ensure local people get the services they need.
  • Ensuring that training to senior and frontline staff builds knowledge and understanding of targeted harassment. This will help improve the services provided to local people.

Recommendation 2: Community safety partnerships should identify how they can play their part in ending targeted harassment.

They can achieve this by:

  • Ensuring targeted harassment is considered during strategic assessments. This will help ensure that evidence on the extent and impact of targeted harassment and the concerns of local people are considered when developing future community safety strategies.
  • Developing clear action plans for preventing and responding to targeted harassment. This will help community safety partnerships agree the responsibilities and resources required from partners; ensure these are evaluated and improve their accountability to local people for their performance in tackling targeted harassment.
  • Ensuring that action plans include partnership action to prevent targeted harassment happening in the first place as well as action to respond to incidents. This will help improve partnership working to prevent targeted harassment from happening and reduce the harm targeted harassment causes to victims and communities.

Recommendation 3: Future guidance on targeted harassment needs to support public authorities to turn good intentions into action that delivers positive outcomes.

This can be achieved by:

  • Outlining practical steps that can help community safety partnerships to develop partnership approaches to preventing targeted harassment based on advancing equality, protecting human rights and fostering good relations.
  • Helping practitioners share learning of what works and what does not work in tackling different types of targeted harassment in different localities across Great Britain.
  • Improving the understanding of senior managers and frontline staff of the experiences and needs of people resulting from a combination of protected characteristics.

Last updated: 25 May 2016