A busy crowded street A busy crowded street

Meet the Scotland Committee

What does the committee do?

The Scotland Committee is a statutory decision-making committee and is responsible for ensuring the overall work of the Commission reflects the needs and priorities of the people of Scotland.

They come from all walks of life and bring with them a breadth of experience which has proved invaluable to the Commission.

The Committee sets the strategic direction and steers the Commission's work in Scotland through:

  • developing the Commission's Strategic and Corporate Plans, in particular in relation to Scotland
  • developing and approving the Scotland Committee's work programme
  • advising on the exercise of the Commission’s functions in so far as they affect Scotland

See the Scotland Committee minutes.

Details of Committee members

Dr Lesley Sawers (Chair)

Lesley is currently Executive Chair of GenAnalytics Ltd, a specialist analytical and market insights consultancy focused on business improvement linked to equality and diversity in the workplace.

Previously Lesley was Vice Principal and Pro Vice Chancellor for Business, Enterprise and Innovation at Glasgow Caledonian University and Chief Executive of the Scottish Council for Development and Industry. She has also held senior leadership positions at Scottish Power, Royal Mail, CACI, Glasgow Chamber of Commerce and VisitScotland.

She holds a number of senior public appointments with a focus on equalities, social justice and economic growth. She is Deputy Chair of the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, a Trustee of Glasgow Life and a Non-Executive Board Member of Glasgow City Marketing Bureau. She is also past Chair of Action for Children (Scotland).

As Scotland Commissioner, she also serves on the Equality and Human Rights Commission Board of Commissioners. Find out more about our Commissioners. 

Emma Ritch

Emma is Executive Director of Engender, which is a feminist NGO working on women’s social, economic and political equality in Scotland. Prior to this she was manager of Close the Gap for nine years, and worked extensively on women’s labour market participation. She is a member of the Scottish Women’s Budget Group, and is acting chair of the Scottish Human Rights Consortium management committee. She is Chair of the board of the Rape Crisis Centre in Glasgow and vice-chair of Rape Crisis Scotland's board. She is also a trustee of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations and the treasurer of the 50:50 campaign.

Among other working groups, she sits on the equality advisory group of Skills Development Scotland and the Scottish Court Service, and a number of groups relating to the delivery of the Scottish National Action Plan for Human Rights.

Lorraine Barrie

Lorraine worked for eight years as a solicitor in a community law centre in Glasgow, where she represented and advised clients on housing, employment, debt, welfare benefits and consumer law. She developed expertise in equality law relating to access to services by EU migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, and worked to challenge discriminatory practices. In partnership with a range of stakeholders she developed drop-ins, bilingual resources and training events to increase awareness of legal rights and remedies.

She now works as Coordinator of South East Integration Network, a broad network of voluntary and statutory organisations delivering education, arts, youth and cultural activities and events in South East Glasgow. She is a trustee of Friends of Romano Lav, a Roma-led charity based in Glasgow.

David Crichton

David is Chair of NHS Health Scotland, having been appointed in December 2016. Health Scotland is a public health body with a particular focus on reducing health inequalities. He was a non-executive Director of Harakat, an Afghan-based NGO promoting investment reform in Afghanistan.

Before joining Health Scotland David worked as an international development advisor for nine years, primarily in Afghanistan and Montserrat with shorter spells in Tanzania, Croatia, Serbia and Macedonia. In Afghanistan he led economic development projects for the UK, US and Canadian international development agencies. He also worked with the NATO forces in southern Afghanistan and Kabul. In Montserrat he worked on trade, investment and tourism projects.

Earlier in his career, David was global Director for Country and Economic Research with the Economist Intelligence Unit, Chief Executive of the Confederation of Forest Industries and Chief Executive of Scottish Enterprise Edinburgh and Lothian.

Naomi McAuliffe

Naomi is the Head of Amnesty International’s Scotland Office and manages their operations in Scotland which covers campaigns, advocacy, communications, activism and fundraising. Having worked for Amnesty for over a decade in Edinburgh and London as well as on several international projects, she has campaigned on an extensive range of human rights issues including running two of their Global campaigns: My Body, My Rights on sexual and reproductive rights; and the poverty and human rights programme covering maternal health, housing rights, Roma and Gypsy Traveller discrimination, corporate accountability and international financial institutions. Before that she started with Amnesty in the Scotland office running the Stop Violence Against Women campaign for Scotland.

Naomi manages Human Rights Consortium Scotland, a network of civil society organisations who work together to protect and promote a human rights-based society in Scotland, which is currently hosted by Amnesty Scotland. She used to also write regularly for the Guardian’s Comment is Free.

Clare MacGillivray

Clare is Development Coordinator for Edinburgh Tenants Federation (ETF), which is the umbrella organisation for tenants and residents' groups in Edinburgh. ETF promotes housing rights and provides independent information, advice and training to tenants in Edinburgh. As chief officer, part of her role was establishing the human rights in housing project to empower residents using a human rights based approach. The project is a partnership with ETF, the Scottish Human Rights Commission and Participation and the Practice of Rights as part of Scotland's National Action Plan for Human Rights. Clare previously worked for two years in India in peacebuilding initiatives and in a leprosy rehabilitation project. Clare also worked for the Tenants Information Service for nine years. She is a Board Member with the International Association for Community Development.

Nicole Busby

Nicole is Professor of Labour Law at the University of Strathclyde, a position she has held since 2012. She specialises in employment and labour law, European social law and policy, discrimination and equality law and human rights. She has published widely in all of these areas. Nicole is a member of the management committee of the Scottish Universities Legal Network in Europe which was established following the UK’s referendum on EU membership to provide impartial legal advice and guidance to policy makers, civil society organisations and others on the legal implications of Brexit.  

Nicole is a member of the Scottish Government’s Employment Tribunal Stakeholder Forum and a founding member of the Scottish Universities Legal Network on Europe (SULNE).

Rami Okasha

Rami is the Executive Director of Strategy and Improvement at the Care Inspectorate, Scotland’s largest scrutiny and improvement body.

He is responsible for leading the Care Inspectorate’s improvement support activities across the care sector, and directs approaches to scrutiny methodology, intelligence, organisational development, corporate reporting, involving people who experience care in decisions, communications and policy development. He co-led the development of Scotland’s Health and Social Care Standards, working with people who use and provide care to ensure these are outcomes-focused, based on human rights and wellbeing, and person-led.

He is also a trustee of Luminate, Scotland’s creative aging organisation which supports arts involving and about age and older people. Before joining the Care Inspectorate in 2013, he worked in public affairs, communications, policy development, and as a trade union officer for the EIS, where he represented teachers in the workplace, including involving discrimination issues.

Marsali Craig

Marsali has professional skills and experience as a local authority Social Worker and as a civil court Solicitor.

She has personal experience of working (and then not being able to work) as a disabled person and 10 years’ experience of travelling in her wheelchair.

Marsali sits on MACS (the Mobility and Accessibility Committee Scotland), which advises the Scottish Government about issues facing disabled people when travelling. She leads on UNCRPD questions and co leads on the Rail work stream.

Marsali was a member of the Scottish Council and then a Trustee and Director of the MS Society.  She was a Director of North-East Sensory Services, a successful Aberdeen based charity supporting people with vision and hearing loss. Marsali sat on the Aberdeen City Children’s  Panel for two terms and currently volunteers as an “expert patient” with the Faculty of Health and Social Care at Robert Gordon University Aberdeen. 

Calum Irving

Calum is the director at the mental health campaign group See Me. See Me is Scotland's national programme to tackle mental health stigma and discrimination, funded by Scottish Government and Comic Relief. Calum leads the group’s programmes in tackling mental health discrimination in Scotland.  Calum has extensive experience in the third sector as well as public affairs, working in communications and campaigns across the public sector including a spell at the Scottish Community Foundation before being appointed director of Stonewall Scotland in 2005. A spell working in Manchester was followed by Calum being appointed as Chief Executive of Voluntary Action Scotland, the network of local third sector support organisations from where he joined See Me.

Last updated: 10 Jan 2018