Core guidance: Dismissal, redundancy, retirement and after a worker has left

Are you an employer?

This guide calls you an employer if you are the person making decisions about what happens in a work situation. Most situations are covered, even if you don’t give your worker a written contract of employment or if they are a contract worker rather than an employee. Other types of worker such as trainees, apprentices and business partners are also covered. If you are not sure, check under 'work situation' in the Glossary. Sometimes, equality law only applies to particular types of worker, such as employees, and we make it clear if this is the case.

What else is in this guide

  • Information about making reasonable adjustments to remove barriers for disabled people who work for you or apply for a job with you.
  • Information about when you are responsible for what other people do, such as your employees.
  • A list of words and key ideas you need to understand this guide – all words highlighted in bold are in this list. They are highlighted the first time they are used in each section.
  • Advice on what to do if someone says they’ve been discriminated against.
  • Information on where to find more advice and support.

Throughout the text, we give you some ideas on what you can do if you want to follow good equality practice and do more than equality law says you must do. This can help you focus on what your workers contribute to your organisation, rather than on their protected characteristics.

Making sure you know what equality law says you must do as an employer

First, use this list to make sure you know what equality law says you must do.

Does the job or position you are dealing with count as a work situation for equality law? Most situations are covered, even if you don’t give your worker a written contract of employment or if they are a contract worker rather than an employee. People in other positions like trainees, apprentices and business partners are also covered. If you are not sure, check the list under ‘work situation’. 

More information

Last Updated: 15 Jul 2010