Case studies: Using Equality Data/Evidence

Case study 1

Addressing the needs of disabled people to find adapted housing

North Ayrshire Council developed a database of properties that had been adapted and they established a database of disabled people who were seeking adapted properties.  They introduced a referral process to ensure that all new applicants are contacted about information on the property database. 

Case study 2

Police raise awareness of Disability related Hate Crime

South Wales Police introduced a development plan for Disability Hate Crime.  This was to improve awareness, understanding and operational effectiveness in relation to Disability Hate Crime.  These incidents are now included as a category of hate crime, and recorded on the records system.  Training was also delivered to staff at the Minorities Support Unit and to Hate Crime Officers.

Case study 3

NHS Centre improves equality data collection

The Wales NHS Centre for Equality and Human Rights undertook a patient equality monitoring project. This has:

  • developed a minimum data set that is inclusive of all six equality strands
  • facilitated the necessary technical changes to be made to the patient information systems operating across NHS Wales
  • delivered training on data collection for front line staff.

Pilots were undertaken before services were obliged to collect the data. It is anticipated that the data will be fundamentally important to the assessment of policy impact on different groups. The next challenge for the organisation involved will be to ensure that the data is analysed and used to inform service design and delivery.

For more information visit the NHS Wales website

Case study 4

Use of technology to enable college to support disabled students

Stanmore College installed accessible software on all of their computers to assist disabled students. They provided students with Alphasmart word processors which have proved to be very useful with dyslexic students for taking notes. The College developed a more effective means of recording illness such as cancer/diabetes and epilepsy as well as severe allergies so that students can be properly supported both in class and during examinations.

All students who have disclosed a disability or an illness are risk assessed. The new Health and Safety Policy and Procedure also ensure that students are well supported if an emergency arises

Case study 5

Police review policies to improve services for people with mental health issues

Through a review process in 2006, it was established that the process of using volunteer Appropriate Adults was not giving sufficient service provision which meant that there were incidences when people with mental disorders were interviewed without an Appropriate Adult present.  Additionally, there were occasions when the attendance time of the Appropriate Adult was too long. The service was altered and contracted Appropriate Adults are now being used to provide this service.  Further contracted Appropriate Adults are being identified and a minor change in working practice has been adopted.

The revised Service has been reviewed and showed that every request for an Appropriate Adult has been fulfilled; the average attendance time from call to arrival at Police station is 53 minutes, and that there has been an average 12% increase in requests from police officers

Case study 6

Council introduces disability awareness training for taxi drivers

South Ayrshire Council worked with Ayr College on a disability awareness module that is now part of the Taxi Drivers Course. This module must be completed in order to be granted a taxi licenses. The Council have introduced a complaints procedure and a complaints form. This will enable passengers to raise any concerns relating to the use of taxis and other forms of public transport in South Ayrshire.
 

Last Updated: 04 Apr 2011